A number of stochastic models have their meaning, interpretation and sense only if they are embedded in a spatial context. We mainly think of spatially distributed random structures such as ensembles of point clouds, paths (e.g., loops), geometric graphs, branching trees, etc., which interact with one another. Many of the models also have a time component, i.e., they are stochastic processes of such random objects. The goal is then always to develop mathematical methods for the macroscopic description of the system. Of particular interest are systems in which phase transitions are hidden, which are brought to the surface with such methods and whose existence is rigorously proven.

One of the main objects of investigation at WIAS are models of randomly interacting loops in a large box at the thermodynamic limit, where the total length of all loops is of the order of magnitude of the volume of the box. The most prominent representative of such models is the interacting Bose gas, in which the famous Bose-Einstein condensation phase transition is suspected: the occurrence of very long loops as soon as the temperature falls below a critical limit. Such models are important prototypes of spin models, i.e. Gibbs' models of particles whose spin space is unlimited and gives rise to new effects. Two different strategies are pursued at WIAS (see also the mathematical topic "Interacting stochastic many-particle systems" and "Large deviations"), namely the analysis of the free energy of the system in the thermodynamic limit in terms of a variational description and with the help of infinitely long Brownian movements as well as the application of manipulations such as reflections and the derivation of correlation inequalities.

Research
A simulation of a Brownian loop system as marks at the points of a point process

Another direction in which the WIAS works are spatial models for large particle clouds with a coagulation mechanism (see the application area "Coagulation"), in which the accidental formation of particularly large (macroscopic) particles for certain coagulation nuclei is investigated after a sufficiently late period in the limit of large particle systems; this is called gelation. This phase transition can be seen as a kind of explosion transition, because all other particles continue to grow normally, and every now and then one particle size jumps over this transition limit. The novelty of the work of the WIAS is to consider spatial models. Simplified models are currently being considered, in which the coagulation is not expressed by a change in the location of the two particles involved, but by the insertion of an edge; in this way a unique geometrical growing graph is created, the connected components of which are studied. The main means here is a combinatorial expansion, as well as an approach using the theory of large deviations, see the mathematical topic of the same name.

There are also decisive spatial influences in the asymptotic analysis of the parabolic Anderson model (see also the mathematical topic "Spectra of random operators"), the spatial randomness of which is given as Gaussian white noise. A meaningful definition of this model was a task in itself and is only possible in dimensions up to three; we are interested in temporally asymptotic behavior, especially with regard to the phenomenon of intermittency. This phenomenon is now well understood for spatially discrete models, but in the continuous case with white noise this is still a challenge that the WIAS faces in dimension two. Since the solution of this equation is not a function but a distribution, a formulation of the effect (namely that the main mass of the solution is concentrated on small islands) is a priori unclear and the proof is difficult.


Publications

  Monographs

  • B. Jahnel, W. König, Probabilistic Methods in Telecommunications, D. Mazlum, ed., Compact Textbooks in Mathematics, Birkhäuser Basel, 2020, XI, 200 pages, (Monograph Published), DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-36090-0 .
    Abstract
    This textbook series presents concise introductions to current topics in mathematics and mainly addresses advanced undergraduates and master students. The concept is to offer small books covering subject matter equivalent to 2- or 3-hour lectures or seminars which are also suitable for self-study. The books provide students and teachers with new perspectives and novel approaches. They may feature examples and exercises to illustrate key concepts and applications of the theoretical contents. The series also includes textbooks specifically speaking to the needs of students from other disciplines such as physics, computer science, engineering, life sciences, finance.

  • W. König, Große Abweichungen, Techniken und Anwendungen, M. Brokate, A. Heinze , K.-H. Hoffmann , M. Kang , G. Götz , M. Kerz , S. Otmar, eds., Mathematik Kompakt, Birkhäuser Basel, 2020, VIII, 167 pages, (Monograph Published), DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-52778-5 .
    Abstract
    Die Lehrbuchreihe Mathematik Kompakt ist eine Reaktion auf die Umstellung der Diplomstudiengänge in Mathematik zu Bachelor- und Masterabschlüssen. Inhaltlich werden unter Berücksichtigung der neuen Studienstrukturen die aktuellen Entwicklungen des Faches aufgegriffen und kompakt dargestellt. Die modular aufgebaute Reihe richtet sich an Dozenten und ihre Studierenden in Bachelor- und Masterstudiengängen und alle, die einen kompakten Einstieg in aktuelle Themenfelder der Mathematik suchen. Zahlreiche Beispiele und Übungsaufgaben stehen zur Verfügung, um die Anwendung der Inhalte zu veranschaulichen. Kompakt: relevantes Wissen auf 150 Seiten Lernen leicht gemacht: Beispiele und Übungsaufgaben veranschaulichen die Anwendung der Inhalte Praktisch für Dozenten: jeder Band dient als Vorlage für eine 2-stündige Lehrveranstaltung

  Articles in Refereed Journals

  • S. Jansen, W. König, B. Schmidt, F. Theil, Distribution of cracks in a chain of atoms at low temperature, Annales Henri Poincare. A Journal of Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, published online on 24.06.2021, DOI 10.1007/s00023-021-01076-7 .
    Abstract
    We consider a one-dimensional classical many-body system with interaction potential of Lennard--Jones type in the thermodynamic limit at low temperature 1/β ∈ (0, ∞). The ground state is a periodic lattice. We show that when the density is strictly smaller than the density of the ground state lattice, the system with N particles fills space by alternating approximately crystalline domains (clusters) with empty domains (voids) due to cracked bonds. The number of domains is of the order of N exp(-β e surf /2) with e surf > 0 a surface energy.

  • A. Hinsen, B. Jahnel, E. Cali, J.-P. Wary, Phase transitions for chase-escape models on Poisson--Gilbert graphs, Electronic Communications in Probability, 25 (2020), pp. 25/1--25/14, DOI 10.1214/20-ECP306 .
    Abstract
    We present results on phase transitions of local and global survival in a two-species model on Gilbert graphs. At initial time there is an infection at the origin that propagates on the Gilbert graph according to a continuous-time nearest-neighbor interacting particle system. The Gilbert graph consists of susceptible nodes and nodes of a second type, which we call white knights. The infection can spread on susceptible nodes without restriction. If the infection reaches a white knight, this white knight starts to spread on the set of infected nodes according to the same mechanism, with a potentially different rate, giving rise to a competition of chase and escape. We show well-definedness of the model, isolate regimes of global survival and extinction of the infection and present estimates on local survival. The proofs rest on comparisons to the process on trees, percolation arguments and finite-degree approximations of the underlying random graphs.

  • CH. Hirsch, B. Jahnel, A. Tóbiás, Lower large deviations for geometric functionals, Electronic Communications in Probability, 25 (2020), pp. 41/1--41/12, DOI 10.1214/20-ECP322 .
    Abstract
    This work develops a methodology for analyzing large-deviation lower tails associated with geometric functionals computed on a homogeneous Poisson point process. The technique applies to characteristics expressed in terms of stabilizing score functions exhibiting suitable monotonicity properties. We apply our results to clique counts in the random geometric graph, intrinsic volumes of Poisson--Voronoi cells, as well as power-weighted edge lengths in the random geometric, κ-nearest neighbor and relative neighborhood graph.

  • A. Tóbiás, B. Jahnel, Exponential moments for planar tessellations, Journal of Statistical Physics, 179 (2020), pp. 90--109, DOI 10.1007/s10955-020-02521-3 .
    Abstract
    In this paper we show existence of all exponential moments for the total edge length in a unit disc for a family of planar tessellations based on Poisson point processes. Apart from classical such tessellations like the Poisson--Voronoi, Poisson--Delaunay and Poisson line tessellation, we also treat the Johnson--Mehl tessellation, Manhattan grids, nested versions and Palm versions. As part of our proofs, for some planar tessellations, we also derive existence of exponential moments for the number of cells and the number of edges intersecting the unit disk.

  Contributions to Collected Editions

  • A. Hinsen, B. Jahnel, E. Cali, J.-P. Wary, Malware propagation in urban D2D networks, in: IEEE 18th International Symposium on on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, ad Hoc, and Wireless Networks, (WiOpt), Volos, Greece, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2020, pp. 1--9.
    Abstract
    We introduce and analyze models for the propagation of malware in pure D2D networks given via stationary Cox--Gilbert graphs. Here, the devices form a Poisson point process with random intensity measure λ, Λ where Λ is stationary and given, for example, by the edge-length measure of a realization of a Poisson--Voronoi tessellation that represents an urban street system. We assume that, at initial time, a typical device at the center of the network carries a malware and starts to infect neighboring devices after random waiting times. Here we focus on Markovian models, where the waiting times are exponential random variables, and non-Markovian models, where the waiting times feature strictly positive minimal and finite maximal waiting times. We present numerical results for the speed of propagation depending on the system parameters. In a second step, we introduce and analyze a counter measure for the malware propagation given by special devices called white knights, which have the ability, once attacked, to eliminate the malware from infected devices and turn them into white knights. Based on simulations, we isolate parameter regimes in which the malware survives or is eliminated, both in the Markovian and non-Markovian setting.

  • A. Hinsen, Ch. Hirsch, B. Jahnel, E. Cali, Typical Voronoi cells for Cox point processes on Manhatten grids, in: 2019 International Symposium on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, ad Hoc, and Wireless Networks (WiOPT), Avignon, France, 2019, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2020, pp. 1--6, DOI 10.23919/WiOPT47501.2019.9144122 .
    Abstract
    The typical cell is a key concept for stochastic-geometry based modeling in communication networks, as it provides a rigorous framework for describing properties of a serving zone associated with a component selected at random in a large network. We consider a setting where network components are located on a large street network. While earlier investigations were restricted to street systems without preferred directions, in this paper we derive the distribution of the typical cell in Manhattan-type systems characterized by a pattern of horizontal and vertical streets. We explain how the mathematical description can be turned into a simulation algorithm and provide numerical results uncovering novel effects when compared to classical isotropic networks.

  Preprints, Reports, Technical Reports

  • B. Jahnel, A. Tóbiás, Absence of percolation in graphs based on stationary point processes with degrees bounded by two, Preprint no. 2774, WIAS, Berlin, 2020, DOI 10.20347/WIAS.PREPRINT.2774 .
    Abstract, PDF (548 kByte)
    We consider undirected graphs that arise as deterministic functions of stationary point processes such that each point has degree bounded by two. For a large class of point processes and edge-drawing rules, we show that the arising graph has no infinite connected component, almost surely. In particular, this extends our previous result for SINR graphs based on stabilizing Cox point processes and verifies the conjecture of Balister and Bollobás that the bidirectional $k$-nearest neighbor graph of a two-dimensional homogeneous Poisson point process does not percolate for k=2.

  • B. Jahnel, A. Tóbiás, E. Cali, Phase transitions for the Boolean model of continuum percolation for Cox point processes, Preprint no. 2704, WIAS, Berlin, 2020, DOI 10.20347/WIAS.PREPRINT.2704 .
    Abstract, PDF (389 kByte)
    We consider the Boolean model with random radii based on Cox point processes. Under a condition of stabilization for the random environment, we establish existence and non-existence of subcritical regimes for the size of the cluster at the origin in terms of volume, diameter and number of points. Further, we prove uniqueness of the infinite cluster for sufficiently connected environments.

  • A. Hinsen, B. Jahnel, E. Cali, J.-P. Wary, Malware propagation in urban D2D networks, Preprint no. 2674, WIAS, Berlin, 2020, DOI 10.20347/WIAS.PREPRINT.2674 .
    Abstract, PDF (3133 kByte)
    We introduce and analyze models for the propagation of malware in pure D2D networks given via stationary Cox--Gilbert graphs. Here, the devices form a Poisson point process with random intensity measure λ, Λ where Λ is stationary and given, for example, by the edge-length measure of a realization of a Poisson--Voronoi tessellation that represents an urban street system. We assume that, at initial time, a typical device at the center of the network carries a malware and starts to infect neighboring devices after random waiting times. Here we focus on Markovian models, where the waiting times are exponential random variables, and non-Markovian models, where the waiting times feature strictly positive minimal and finite maximal waiting times. We present numerical results for the speed of propagation depending on the system parameters. In a second step, we introduce and analyze a counter measure for the malware propagation given by special devices called white knights, which have the ability, once attacked, to eliminate the malware from infected devices and turn them into white knights. Based on simulations, we isolate parameter regimes in which the malware survives or is eliminated, both in the Markovian and non-Markovian setting.

  Talks, Poster

  • B. Jahnel, Phase transitions for the Boolean model for Cox point processes, Workshop on Randomness Unleashed Geometry, Topology, and Data, September 22 - 24, 2021, University of Groningen, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Groningen, Netherlands, September 23, 2021.

  • B. Jahnel, Phase transitions for the Boolean model for Cox point processes (online talk), DYOGENE Seminar (Online Event), INRIA Paris, France, January 11, 2021.

  • B. Jahnel, Phase transitions for the Boolean model for Cox point processes (online talk), Probability Seminar Bath (Online Event), University of Bath, Department of Mathematical Sciences, UK, October 18, 2021.

  • W. König, A box version of the interacting Bose gas, Workshop on Randomness Unleashed Geometry, Topology, and Data, September 22 - 24, 2021, University of Groningen, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Groningen, Netherlands, September 23, 2021.

  • B. Jahnel, Phase transitions for the Boolean model for Cox point processes (online talk), Bernoulli-IMS One World Symposium 2020 (Online Event), August 24 - 28, 2020, August 27, 2020.